How immigration can have a negative economic impact on a community


#21

My question was how is that good for the middle class homeowner/taxpayer? Let me see, crowded schools, lower property value and higher taxes. Yeah those politicians are really fighting for the middle class.


#22

Isn’t educating poor people, who couldn’t otherwise afford an education, kind of one of the main points of public education? You know, because the alternative is just a ■■■■ ton of uneducated poor people?


#23

The man in your avatar (Krugman) wrote a factual column for the NYT’s in 2006 on how immigration hurts wages of Americans. Of course he has since modified his stance since the left has taken a different view on illegal immigration in the past eight years.


#24

Honesty, a lot of people’s biggest problem with immigrants is simply having to look at them. Wish people would be more upfront about it.


#25

Those sure are some good parents.


#26

My question is how is it good for the middle class homeowner/taxpayer to have overcrowded schools, lower property values and higher taxes?


#27

I don’t think it works that way.
It appears that everything is based on supply and demand. Crowded schools are a function of population density - a fast-growing number of students in a fixed number of classrooms. This could be alleviated by limiting the demand for classrooms - by your example, preventing illegal immigrants from attending school. Yet experience shows that low levels of education result in higher levels of poverty and crime. This doesn’t just happen in America’s inner cities; it happens in rural America, in historical accounts, and in developing countries as well. There’s a reason we don’t build airplanes in Somalia.

You would be hard-pressed to find higher property values than the subject of your OP - Los Angeles. Yet within that market, there are a range of values. Looking at different neighborhoods, there is a strong correlation between prices and income levels - High-priced neighborhoods have higher income and low-priced neighborhoods have modest incomes. In addition, there are neighborhoods with multi-family rental units that are typically in poverty. Wealthy neighborhoods don’t normally have overcrowded classrooms. Poor neighborhoods typically have overcrowding. But wealthy neighborhoods generally pay higher property taxes for their more expensive homes and poor neighborhoods pay little or no property tax, since they don’t own homes - they rent.

There seems to be a correlation. If you want better schools, you buy better schools by paying higher taxes. If you want worse schools, you pay less taxes. Just like buying a car or a refrigerator - you get what you pay for.

The best way to keep people in poverty is to deny them an education. Poor people can only make limited investments in their communities, so property values remain low. If you educate people so they have more opportunities, they earn more money to pay for property, so values go up. Higher taxes invested in schools raises property values.

Besides, taxes are going to rise inevitably. Which would you rather spend them on - Schools or Police?


#28

You appear to be blurring the distinction between Legal and Illegal immigration. And even though 2006 was before the 2008 Crash and Great Recession (which changed everything) and before Thomas Piketty’s groundbreaking “Capital in the 21st Century (2013)”, I don’t think Krugman has changed his views on immigration that much. I’d bet he’s always made a distinction between the Economic effects of immigration and the Moral Imperatives of immigration.


#29

Actually yes it does, it is simple economics. The fact is that if many low-income families move into a middle-class community the middle class homeowners of that community will absolutely be negatively and economically impacted through overcrowded schools, lower property values and higher taxes. And that’s my main point is that middle class American homeowners are absolutely impacted. Part of the problem is that cost of caring for a child in America has ballooned exponentially. When you include education, healthcare, food, housing, etc., that’s around $30,000/year per child. Why do you think that so many native born Americans eschew having children nowadays.


#30

I live in AZ. I just sold my home and moved out of the town I was in for bout 12 yrs.
Tamale factory(house full of illegals)out of the house next door, drug n child ring across the street, 3 car shops out of their garages, etc…this is just part of one street, you cant even find jobs or housing because of so many people from Calif. coming here, graffiti has popped up everywhere, crime has sky rocketed, this was a town that didn’t see much crime, if there was it was someone stole something from the store or something like that, we have drive by shootings now… the Democrats are killing us off with their foreign n domestic policies. the health dept. and police, ice, border patrol wouldn’t do anything,wait, they did make them move a car that wasn’t running once.


#31

I agree. And public schooling allows those parents to go out, find work, and earn a living rather than stay home and mind their children on public assistance.


#32

How does a low-income family ($40K/yr) afford to buy or rent a $500,000 middle-class house ($3000/mo) in Los Angeles?

Typically, homeowners move out (or up) and investors buy the properties and rent to poor families. Renters don’t pay property taxes and investors don’t care about good schools.


#33

Growing pains.

Welcome to Urban America.


#34

I thank God everyday I sold my home in Calif and moved out here years ago when Bill Clinton was president. I told everyone Calif was going to be turned into a ghetto schiffhole., then when Barry O came along, I started telling people he was going to turn America into one, then started telling people that AZ was going to be overran with people from Calif, and they would end up voting for Democrats in our state, his policies brought ruin to everything that dude touched, AZ ended up voting for Enema, I mean Ms. semina or w/e her name is, Good God look how we’ve turned out


#35

I was being facetious. Just because they happened to make it here illegally we should shoulder their burden and help them become productive members of society?

What laws can I break then get rewarded for?

I’m glad DAPA was rejected at all levels.


#36

I think you missed the greater point. If we enforced our borders and deported illegals we would not have to educate them nor be concerned about their career opportunities.


#37

We deport them.

We educate the children of legal immigrants.


#38

You realize every single one of their countries has public education right?


#39

What an ignorant post.


#40

Oh the sweet, SWEET irony!