Dealing with depression, mental illness, and the sadder aspects of life


#62

I don’t think that OTC unsupervised mechanical brain stimulation is anything I should be fiddling with. Lol.


#63

Hard to argue with that, I wouldn’t try it unsupervised. But at least it doesn’t appear to be some scam product.


#64

Sorry to hear that my friend
my wife and i are sending prayers to you and yours


#65

Are there any actual solutions to depression, or is it just a never-ending ■■■■ storm of attrition?


#66

Thanks. She was an organ donor and they were able to help 8 other people at her loss.


#67

Some of the newer drugs are fantastic. But for some people nothing works. My brother-in-law suffered a debilitating and intractable depression for the last 15 years of his life, before he OD’ed on prescription meds one night and passed away. Coroner ruled it accidental, buy who knows. He tried everything, including electric shock therapy. It was a terrible life. He went from being the life of every party to a shell of a person.

After he died, my sister made an appointment with his doc to talk about everything, he admitted that sometimes nothing ever works.x


#68

That is great she is an organ donor
I myself never realized just how important it could be
until our daughter needed a kidney transplant


#69

So sad. My heart goes out.


#70

Thanks!
Two very important lessons to be learned, or reinforced in this tragedy. First, from what we understand she was not wearing her seat belt. It was a roll over accident. She was thrown from the car an received irrecoverable brain damage. She had her three kids with her, they were all strapped in and are ok. Seat belts save lives. First lesson.
Second is the importance of letting everyone know you wish to be an organ donor if you so choose.
It is rather odd. Just before this happened, or that we heard of it. I had posted about a heart recipient meeting her donors parents.
Spooky!


#71

CBT helped for a while, and now I’m in DBT. In regards to medications, Sertraline was doing great for me, but I think I’ve built up a tolerance to it. Overall, there are treatments out there, and there are some biotechnology studies (that a former student of one of my professors did) that have linked PTSD and depression to inflammation in the brain. I think that depression can be in remission, but that it never goes away. At least that has been the case in my experience.


#72

I’m sorry about your loss, Lucy.


#73

Thanks FlameHeart. That was probably 14 years ago but I still miss him. The coroner ruled his OD as accidental, because even though he swallowed a bottle of pills, it was not a toxic dose and he shouldn’t have died. For some reason I get some peace from that, as I have a clear vision of God just deciding that night that Bill would suffer no longer and wrapped him up in his arms and took him to a better place.


#74

I was going to say: is it similar to the device I had in the drawer of my night table in my late 20s and early 30s, for those times when I was single and just a little depressed. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

Great thread Nik. Hope you are well!


#75

Ah yes. Sometimes OTC unsupervised mechanical brain stimulation is just the ticket.


#76

I’m hanging in as best I can. These days I’m basically just treading water. I just enrolled in therapy again, so maybe that will help. I really need to sit down and start writing again, but for the life of me I just don’t feel like I have anything to say anymore.


#77

Is this the most sterile euphemism I have ever read? :slight_smile:


#78

Damn it Lou, I’m sorry to hear that. Life can really pile it on us sometimes, can’t it?


#79

Nik, I always found it really helpful, when times are bad, to just sit with pen and paper and just free-style write. About anything. Hopes, dreams, pains, possibilities, hurts, anxieties, anything. It doesn’t have to be perfect, just scribble it out. Then get up and run it all through the shredder. It feels like such a burden gets lifted. Not just one time. Do it every day for a month. It might help.


#80

Hang in there, sweetie. I don’t think I’ve shared this explicitly here in 14 years, but around the time I joined this forum in 2004, I had my own serious/clinical bout, and still deal with it on and off. One of the consolations of middle age is realizing how common it is and how (generally) supportive people are.


#81

Yeah, I think something like that would help break the ice. My goal is to make a career of it. Something I can do from home with very little stress. I can’t deal with working things like retail anymore. Being in the general public may actually kill me.