MUELLER'S EXCUSES: Manafort Judge DELAYS Testimony After Special Counsel COMPLAINS

Originally published at: https://www.hannity.com/media-room/muellers-excuses-manafort-judge-delays-testimony-after-special-counsels-complaint/

The fiery judge presiding over the special counsel’s tax fraud case against former Trump campaign Chairman Paul Manafort suddenly delayed new testimony Friday, following a strong “push back” form Mueller’s team.

“Judge T.S. Ellis III mysteriously delayed testimony Friday in the case of ex-Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, pushing off the day’s proceedings for hours after prosecutors once again complained about his criticism of them,” writes Fox News. “It’s not clear if the delay is connected to the complaint filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team.”

Robert Mueller’s legal team filed a motion against Ellis Friday morning, claiming the judge was “unfairly criticizing them” in front of the jury, adding it may impact their final decision.

“Mueller deputy Andrew Weissmann and other attorneys on the team specifically noted how Ellis made negative comments this week about their focus on a bank loan Manafort applied for but did not receive,” writes Fox.

Read the full story here.

Didn’t Mueller team wanted the DC area so they can get favorable jury pool?

Wow! The snowflake comes out in Mueller.

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Considering what the judge has done and stated in front of the jury I don’t blame the prosecution for making formal complaint. If he had behaved with the defense as he has with the prosecution the defense would have doubtless filed for a mistrial. Unfortunately prosecutions don’t have that option.

Regardless whether the prosecution wants a favorable jury pool, the defense also wants that, what both a prosecution and a defense team do not want is a judge that interferes innapropiately in how they try their cases. Neither want a judge that might be tainting questioning or testimony in the eyes of the jury.

Mueller isn’t the prosecuting attorney in the Manafort trial.

For the Record, Judge Ellis has already had to instruct the jury once that “I may well have been wrong” when the Prosecution filed a motion after the Judge was previously berating them in open court about allowing a witness in the courtroom that he had given them permission to have there.