It was warmer 1000 and 2000 years ago


#62

But why use that when we have thermometers…


#63

They put the modern data a the top of the error bars to make the graph look dramatic. To fool the none science educated.

It should be in the middle of the error bars like the rest of the data.


#64

You just don’t understand what “global” means, do you?


#65

Because you don’t change data collection methods in the middle of an experiment…


#66

Nice, they have about zero southern hemisphere data before the 1950’s… And it’s thin after that too. So, most of the graphs you see are based on the northern hemisphere not the south, and there fore are not global…


#67

Your explanation is gibberish.


#68

Error bars are not always defined by +/- X. An error interval could be defined as +X / -Y. U are assuming the factors that contribute to an error are normally distributed. I don’t know if that is the case here.

Going back in time, we have far less knowledge of those factors so likely assume a normal distribution.


#69

What is your scientific education?


#70

What? You posted an anecdote about it being cold here in the US as evidence against global warming. I posted that at the exact same time, Australia is experiencing record highs, negating your anecdote by pointing out the “global” part of global warming.

Pro tip, avoid using anecdotal cold temperatures to refute global warming. That’s a rookie level mistake.


#71

You are just admitting your ignorance of science…


#72

People can claim anything online, so that’s a silly question. Do you think you need a PHD in climatology to read a graph with error bars. I learned that is 7th grade science.


#73

You didn’t learn this type of statistical analysis in 7th grade. That’s for sure which is why your “explanation” is gibberish. The last thing you do is count “eyeballing” a graph to be any type of analysis.

Do you claim to have any post secondary scientific education at all?


#74

At least Borgia tried a mathematical guess at why the modern data is at the top of the error bar instead of the middle. Thus acknowledging, I’m correct.


#75

You’re so far off you’re not even wrong.


#76

Yes, I’m not wrong, thanks…


#77

Eyeballing a graph is no substitute for actual analysis. Did they teach you that in the 7th grade?


#78

Uncertainty in measurement begins in the 8th grade at our school, a private, independent, college prep school on the order of the best independent schools in the country. There is no exact length, mass, volume, etc. in the universe because all of those measurements involve uncertainty, which is a difficult concept for 8th-graders to wrap their brains around. Uncertainty is propagated the more measurements and equations are involved in a calculated value, but this is an advanced topic. Error bars are not a 7th-grade level topic.


#79

Hey Cratic,
Suppose you dissolve about 2.00 grams of salt in 20.00 grams of water. The resulting mass is 20.00 grams. What do you conclude?


#80

It has always been warmer in August, than in January! That must mean something.

Sarc.


#81

I’m sorry. I misspoke. Suppose you dissolve 2.00 grams of salt in 2.00 grams of water. The result is 21.98 grams. What do you conclude?