Trump Grounds Boeing 737 MAX 8 and 9 Jets After Two Crashes


#104

From what I’ve read, that combined with certain atmospheric conditions that set off the AOA sensors for periods of like 10-15ms at a time, a feedback loop makes the MCAS think the plane is stalling and thus the nose dives.


#105

Completely agree. I can’t imagine how stressful that would be.


#106

Give it a rest Lou.


#107

A combination of all of these factors seems completely bonkers to me.


#108

100% agree. Like I said above…just switching to a car I haven’t driven in a while is unnerving to me.


#109

Virtually all airline crashes are caused by a combination of events any one of which without the others would not have been a problem.


#110

Wall Street Journal reports that a software fix has been in the works for months, but was delayed 5 weeks because of the government shutdown.


#111

Obese Donald Trump thought grounding these planes was unneccessary. It would be nice if he would put himself and his family where his mouth is with them only flying on these planes.


#112

Give it a rest Lou before you give yourself a stroke.


#113

Do you know that it took the US 2 weeks to Ground DC 10s after the Chicago disaster…the worst in US history…two weeks? Took Donald 4 days. Get off his back. He did the right thing…much more timelt than I expected.


#114

Seems like a good idea.


#115

You can’t separate the hardware and software in today’s systems. The software is, in fact, part of the plane.


#116

Here’s an article that came over a bit ago from the NY Times. Pretty scary.


#117

I found this the other day on the differences between regular 737’s and the MAX. For me it’s really technical, so for the Brainiac’s out there, have at it.

http://www.b737.org.uk/737maxdiffs.htm


#118

According to what I’ve read and seen at full power it wants to pitch down causing the pilots to fight the computer trying to get back to a nose up flight profile.

As for your question I have a little flight experience in both single and twin engine Cessnas but I doubt I could even land one on a calm day tomorrow without some retraining.

We had a buddy with his own planes and an instructor rating and got a little hands on experience with him when I was 17/18 and planning to go into the Army to fly Helicopters through the WO flight program.


#119

Boeing was never shut down, nor was the FAA and NO US domestic or international flights on this model have crashed.

The Gov’t shutdown lasted five weeks, ending on January 25th.

Boeing is attempting to blame shift because of their liability which will probably run into at least 8-10 figures over these two crashes.


#120

That is correct but they made changes to the stabilizers and if I remember correctly shifted the wing mount position slightly forward to compensate.

The software issue seems to be that it overreacts to the nose up tendencies forcing it into a nose down position and the pilots appear to then be overreacting causing the up/down oscillation.

Going to be interesting to see how all of this shakes out from a technical standpoint.


#121

Not really. Correct a few lines of code and this problem goes away. The airframe is still the same. In fact, flip the switch that activates the MCAS to the off position and the problem goes away.


#122

This is aggravating.


#123

As I said earlier, Ethiopia known to be a “ ■■■■ hole” country.