Trump Grounds Boeing 737 MAX 8 and 9 Jets After Two Crashes


#63

Anybody here actually fly? Not being critical, just asking.


#64

Based on what I’ve read and heard I personally believe that Boeing knows exactly what the problem is they just didn’t see it as critical and believed it could be patched away…

But I could be wrong…


#65

I think they believe our pilots can handle this. But i doubt a pilot with 200 hours compares to one with thousands of hours.


#66

No.

I am saying he is leading from BEHIND.

It wasn’t by itself the first crash, or by itself the second crash, or by itself the revelation of multiple Pilots on the NASA site decrying their similar flight scare experiences with that jet model. No, it was the totality of all of that and his playing Johnny come lately to the conclusion, obviously reluctantly, to ground the jets AFTER EVERYONE ELSE but America had already taken that cautious step.

Does that answer your question?


#67

I am not aware of any significant difference in that regard between the Max 8 & 9 and previous 737 models, are you?


#68

Yes, but not anymore and not jets, let alone heavies.


#69

After the first crash, I saw a video in which a very experienced airline pilot demonstrated that once the issue with the automatic anti-stall device is recognized by the pilot, it can easily be resolved by simply flipping one switch to deactivate the system and flying the airplane.


#70

You set an extremely low bar.


#71

Yes and have a few friends who fly them.


#72

That is what i was made aware of as well. My buddy flies for American and my future son in law is learning to fly at college…they both said it’s just that easy.


#73

I know what kind of plane it was and is.

That’s a bit premature…


#74

Yeah, I think I’ve read the larger engines on the MAXs and position cause the COG to be moved forward and a higher AOA from what I’ve ready (something to do with the engine nacelles?).


#75

Here’s the reddit thread I found that was pretty interesting: https://www.reddit.com/r/flying/comments/b08h03/737_max_mega_thread/eidycdx/


#76

Wow that is interesting. I wish my Daughter’s boyfriend was home. I’d love to get the flight student’s take on this and what they are learning from this. But it seems to me that the 200 hours of flight time of the pilot in the Ethiopian crash would not even be close enough for flight time in the US…and one has to wonder how much simulator time they have had on the MAX’s there either. where they would potentially train for every scenario including computer malfunction. Had this scenario happened in the US…I think Pilots would have figured in a matter of seconds that they needed to fly the plane…flip off the MCAS and fly the damn plane. I don’t think the Ethiopian pilots knew enough to do so…and it may have been part of their training, to not, and let the plane fly itself in essence…let it correct. Interesting stuff though.


#77

From what I’ve read, the MAX’s interface is different than the typical 737 and the indicators are confusing in this type of situation. One comment I read was pilots found out in the car to the airport that their 737 would be a MAX and it was the first time they flew it. They had to read the materials in the car to try and get familiar with the systems. The pilot’s notes were absolutely terrifying, admitting that they were inadequately briefed and familiar with the systems to be able to fly in unfavorable weather conditions.


#78

Here it is:

Boeing 737 Max pilots complained to feds for months about suspected safety flaw

1555013 is pretty damning in telling how the airlines treated the MAX as the same type as the 737-800:

I had my first flight on the Max [to] ZZZ1. We found out we were scheduled to fly the aircraft on the way to the airport in the limo. We had a little time [to] review the essentials in the car. Otherwise we would have walked onto the plane cold.My post flight evaluation is that we lacked the knowledge to operate the aircraft in all weather and aircraft states safely.

The instrumentation is completely different - My scan was degraded, slow and labored having had no experience w/ the new ND (Navigation Display) and ADI (Attitude Director Indicator) presentations/format or functions (manipulation between the screens and systems pages were not provided in training materials. If they were, I had no recollection of that material).

We were unable to navigate to systems pages and lacked the knowledge of what systems information was available to us in the different phases of flight. Our weather radar competency was inadequate to safely navigate significant weather on that dark and stormy night. These are just a few issues that were not addressed in our training.

I recommend the following to help crews w/ their introductory flight on the Max:Email notification the day before the flight (the email should include: Links - Training Video, PSOB and QRG and all relevant updates/FAQ’s)SME (Subject Matter Expert) Observer - the role of the SME is to introduce systems navigation, display management, answer general questions and provide standardized best practices to the next generation aircraft.Additionally, the SME will collect de-identified data to provide to the training department for analysis and dissemination to the line pilots regarding FAQs and know systems differences as well best practices in fly the new model aircraft."

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=19374386


#79

With Obese Donald Trump the bar has to be set on the lowest rung.


#80

Yeah…Just because it is a 737…doesn’t mean it is something they are familiar with. I can’t imagine that would happen here, but if you are saying that it did happen here that is very scary. My buddy who flies for American used to fly MD 80s for American Eagle, then graduated to 737-800s and it took him two years of flying with a certified pilot before they let him become a full fledged captain which just took place 2 years ago…so he’s been flying 800s for the better part of 4 years. It is amazing to me that anywhere would just put two pilots in the ■■■■■■■ of a plane they were completely unfamiliar with.


#81

“Dennis Tajer, a 737 captain who attended the meeting with Boeing executives, recalled, “They said, ‘Look, we didn’t include it because we have a lot of people flying on this and we didn’t want to inundate you with information.’ ”

“I’m certain I did say, ‘Well that’s not acceptable,’ ” said Tajer, a leader in the association representing American Airlines pilots.”

Can’t say I’m shocked.


#82

I’m grateful for this decision, although the FAA chairman should have made the decision. (there is no chairman)

My daughter is a flight attendant and she was scheduled on a MAX 9 today from Houston, but the airline switched planes yesterday evening.