Sweden herd immunity? Doesn’t look like it

Sweden joining the ranks of countries fighting a second wave of the pandemic.

4,000 cases per day, 1004 hopsitalizations.

It doesn’t appear that the attempt to get to herd immunity worked.

If the vaccines work as advertised, all the extra swedish deaths become unnecessary casualties who might have otherwise been saved by flattening the curve

They simultaneously took the inevitable economic hit and ate the human cost. All while disguising weak-willed, lazy policy as some sort of brave immunity experiment. This was so dumb.

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What country with mandates did better?

According to worldmeters, Sweden had no new cases in the last 2 days.

6,000? Illinois and Texas do almost twice that in a day.

#23 in deaths per million. In the middle of Europe. Despite being a Schengen cooperation member. Of course they eventually shut off travel.

Less than 200 serious/critical cases.

Looks like more of the same. More cases…less severity of outcomes.

Doesn’t appear lockdowns made any big difference.

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Be my surmise. Mask mandates either.

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Comn sneaky deaths per 100,000 in Europe

Sweden 71
Norway 6

Guess which country managed the pandemic better?

hint: it ain’t sweden.

Allan

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as i have been saying, without a vaccine, because of the pattern by which this virus spreads, natural herd immunity does not seem to me to be achievable.

Finland and Norway Avoid Covid-19 Lockdowns but Keep the Virus At Bay

Tight controls on travel and borders—and political consensus—helped the Nordic nations fight the pandemic

Wow…common ■■■■■■■ sense prevails and strong border control. Who’d a thunk it?

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You missed the “political consensus” part.

For example, Norway does have restrictions, and are urging everyone to stay at home, socially distance, and avoid unnecessary travel.

And I can guarantee you the Norwegians will do it and not whine about how their “Freeberty” is being constrained. Which is why you pointing out how other countries have avoided lockdowns is nonsensical because here we can’t even begin to do the basics that the people in those countries did…because “FREEBERTY!”

No…here in the US we are making memes about the “turkey police” and the airports were (relatively speaking) bursting at the seams last night…

It was more than common sense. It was smart policy, contact tracing ability, trust and support of government, a belief in the science and a sense of community and duty to protect others. The population utilizing a contact tracing app and trusting the government would be derided as ‘sheople’ by Americans with their “Open 'er Up!” strategy. We had the head of the government and his subordinates downplays masks, promote questionable and dangerous treatments, host super spreader spreader events and questions public health experts and promote quacks while claiming the virus was fake or actually real but would soon go away. It’s been a complete ■■■■ show.

Finland and Norway follow a similar playbook of strict border controls, mandatory quarantines and detailed contact-tracing focused on preventing superspreading events when infections do occur. Travelers to Norway must produce a negative test to enter the country and must stay confined for 10 days in a certified hotel after arriving. Violators are subject to high fines or deportation.

Both countries also stand out for having forged a broad political consensus around their pandemic plans. The measures have changed little over time, avoiding the confusion of ever-shifting rules in the rest of Europe, and polls show they enjoy broad public support.

In Norway, government and opposition parties held a joint news conference in March to support the nation’s pandemic policy. The government has published every piece of expert advice underpinning the measures, and Prime Minister Erna Solberg holds televised news conferences for children, where she and her ministers field questions about the pandemic. Similar events took place in Finland in April.

On the health front, authorities in Norway and Finland are able to trace the origin of most new coronavirus cases whereas in Germany, which has fared better in the pandemic than most large European nations, the origin can’t be determined in 75% of cases. When Norwegian authorities noticed that the incidence of Covid-19 was higher among some minorities, they organized meetings with community and religious leaders to devise a common information strategy.

To be sure, both nations benefit from their low population density, a sophisticated digital infrastructure, world-class health care systems and relatively high levels of public trust in government. Nearly half of Finland’s 5.5 million inhabitants use the government’s coronavirus contact-tracing app—among the highest rates in Europe—and compliance with the rules exceeds 80%, said Vivikka Richt, spokeswoman for the health care ministry.

“When the government makes rules to protect us from a pandemic, we don’t go out to streets to protest against them like [people did in] other countries,” Ms. Richt said in reference to protests across the U.S. and Europe.

Such trust was key to Norway’s ability to contain contagion without imposing draconian measures, said Bent Høie, the country’s health care minister. Early on, Mr. Høie invoked the Old Norse tradition of dugnad—unpaid communal work carried out in solidarity with neighbors—as a recipe for beating the pandemic.

“It’s very important for people to trust not only the government, but also each other: they know that when they follow the rules, their neighbor will do the same,” Mr. Høie said.

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So none of their political leaders had mass gatherings to stroke their ego?

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Stopping short of a second lockdown, the new measures nevertheless recommend everyone to stay at home if they can, avoid unnecessary domestic travel and impose stricter limits on public gatherings. Visiting Norway also becomes more challenging for all non-residents.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ common sense ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I spend much of my free time outdoors. Last night, I went to a small gathering and at oysters, steamed and served outside…while partaking in a virus killing rye. This is what I call common sense and recommned it to all. Live your life but choose wisely and automatically believe you have the virus and take the necessary precautions not to infect others.

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In Norway the people act like adults and they have success.

In the US, we act like spoiled children and say “How come we can’t have what Norway has”?

You don’t get nice things when you act like spoiled brats.

The longer it takes people to figure it out, the fewer nice things we will have.

So stop telling me about how successful Norway has been when you have no desire to do what Norway’s people have done.

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I wonder what Norwegian social media looks like.

Your anecdote shows you do not get it.

We can’t have the results Norway has had because we can’t get our people to act as Norway’s people have.

PEOPLE…not the odd person here or there.

So what you are saying is that the National leaders didn’t leave it up to the State leaders to handle but did everything they could to undermine the State leader’s authority?

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You mean SHEOPLE.

I’m fuzzy about your use of cosplay. The word makes me think of Star Trek geeks dressed up in costumes and staying 6 feet apart at a conference.

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if you want to live somewhere where government is trusted move there. here, the foundation of the very nation is the electorate and the press mistrusting government.

The founding fathers set out by design to create an untrustworthy and incompetent government.

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