Legalizing All Illegal Drugs


#126

Ok so you didn’t even read the first paragraph did you?

home of suspected heroin dealers


#127

Yeah, I did. The reason people care about the story is that they weren’t heroin dealers.


#128

But, let’s grant that they actually were heroin dealers. Does that mean that the SWAT team should gun them down? No, of course it doesn’t.

As a side note: it’s another story where the cops shoot a dog.


#129

Then why did you make this claim quoting the story?

LOL, they send in SWAT teams for twitch streamers.

The fact is they sent the SWAT team in not because they were going after users, they thought they had a house full of heroin dealers which make such raids extremely high risk for the officers serving the warrants since they tend to be very well armed and very willing to use those arms to resist being caught.

Now, back to your own cited article.

The home of Tuttle and Nicholas seems to have fallen short of the heroin dealer den police likely expected to find. According to the Chronicle , police recovered from the scene several guns and “small amounts” of marijuana and white powder that later tested positive for cocaine. Police have not said whether the guns were legally purchased, and the exact amounts of marijuana and cocaine found have not been publicly released. Though the household’s suspected heroin stash served as the main legal basis for the raid, there is so far no indication that officers found any of the drug.

On Wednesday, Acevedo released parts of the search warrant that allowed for the raid. According to the affidavit, the narcotics squad had been investigating the house for two weeks when they enlisted a confidential informant to go into the house and attempt to buy drugs (Acevedo said at a press conference Thursday that police received a tip earlier in January from an anonymous caller, who said her daughter had been inside the house doing heroin and that there were guns inside).

On Wednesday, Acevedo released parts of the search warrant that allowed for the raid. According to the affidavit, the narcotics squad had been investigating the house for two weeks when they enlisted a confidential informant to go into the house and attempt to buy drugs (Acevedo said at a press conference Thursday that police received a tip earlier in January from an anonymous caller, who said her daughter had been inside the house doing heroin and that there were guns inside). At that point investigators did not know the names of anyone who lived inside the house, only that there was a man inside who looked to be around 55 years old. On Sunday, the officers met with the informant, gave him some money, and sent him inside the house to try to buy drugs. He returned with “brown powder” that later tested positive for heroin.

According to the affidavit, the informant said he bought the powder from the middle-aged man, who called it “boy,” a street name for heroin. The informant also said that the man carried a gun, and that there was more of the brown powder at the house, “packaged in a large quantity of plastic baggies.” The author of the affidavit wrote that the informant had “proven to be credible and reliable on many prior occasions” and he asked a municipal court judge “to enter the suspected place and premises without first knocking and announcing the presence and purpose of the officers executing the warrant.” As probable cause for the no-knock raid, the investigator wrote that because there was heroin inside and the man there was armed, it was reasonable to believe that the suspect would use the gun to defend himself or to buy time to destroy the drugs if he knew beforehand that police were going to enter the house. The order was signed at 1:30 p.m. on Monday. Within three and a half hours police had arrived at the house, armed and ready.

So, if we accept the facts as reported to be true the level of force was certainly reasonable based on the two week long investigation prior to the raid.

Once again the facts simply don’t support your claim that the officers simply “gunned them down”. Four of the cops were also shot.


#130

Have you a link to this claim?


#131

Well, the twitch streamer quote related to the fact that swatting is a regular occurrence in twitch streaming.

Who cares what they thought? High risk? We see who pays the consequences for high risk situations.


#132

Who exactly is forcing anyone to use drugs?

I could use medicinal marijuana if I wanted to for migraines.

But there are at least two acupuncture clinics closer to me than the cannabis doc, & an appointment costs less even with insurance not paying, plus acupuncture is effective.

I’m the last to care if someone else chooses the marijuana option. But, as many of us choose other options, who exactly if forcing anyone to use in the first place? Since there’s such an “epidemic”?


#133

There are low THC strains of marijuana as well as not smoking it.

Some don’t want to smoke it into their lungs, so take advantage of oil in tincture or capsules; gummy bears or chocolate bars.


#134

Now you’re just babbling vacuous anti cop rhetoric.

Call in two users on a corner somewhere or a couple of people smoking a pipe on their couch and see if the swat team shows up.

Call in psycho threatening his ex and family and they will show up.

Cops are favored targets by the leftwing race baiting extremists, terrorists, gangs, and especially drug cartels so you can bet they will show up in force and ready for a fight when responding to any situation that calls for such a response.

There’s no evidence to suggest they responded inappropriately in your cited article and four cops along with the two perp’s paid the price. Luckily the cops all appear to have survived.

If you’re a drug dealer and the cops come kicking in your door on a raid it’s a really bad idea to pick up a gun and start shooting as the cops are going to win at least 99% of the time.

Are there bad cops? Sure, root them out and throw the book at them.

Are there stupid cops? Sure there are but you get what you pay for.

Can cops be better? Sure they can but being as they are human we will never see perfection.


#135

Being a cynic, I would love to think politicians have seen the light and want a smaller government. I suspect drug companies smell a fortune waiting to be made, and rather than going through government bureaucracy are instead pushing for legalization at a grassroots level which will make politicians smell votes and jump on the bandwagon.

Who benefits from car seats for babies, car seats for toddlers, car seats for young children? We are told it is the children, but look at the profit margins for those who manufacture and sell them.

We are but puppets on a string for big businesses, perhaps especially for drug companies. Don’t expect help from the government officials who need/want campaign funding and votes.


#136

I’m for making drugs legal.
A couple of reasons come to mind.

  1. You can’t stop them regardless of how hard you try. People will get what they want in one way or the other.
  2. Making drugs illegal raises the price so users have to steal to be able to buy them.
    It also attracts those who are fascinated by the “forbidden”. It’s human nature. Make bacon grease illegal and you’ll have big money hog cartels spring up and thrive.

#137

It’s also a strong deterrent for anyone of even marginal intelligence because a single drug conviction can/will eliminate you from most high paying careers.

Opening up the flood gates through legalization will only ensure millions more Americans will become addicts and victims of hard drugs and hard drug users.


#138

Prove it.


#139

It was proven in the era prior to the passage of drug laws which is why they were passed in the first place.

Your demand makes as much sense as telling someone they have to put a gun to their head to prove that pulling the trigger will result in death.


#140

They can’t force these mushrooms down my throat. Just let them try.


#141

No, it has not ever been proven


#142

So during prohibition did drinking increase, decrease, or stay roughly the same? And what happened after its repeal?


#144

Sounds like you are a strong proponent for making Vicodin and other opioids illegal except for when directly administered by a doctor


#145

We all have choices to make every day. Some will be good, some not as good and some will be bad. The question then becomes, “what did you learn Dorothy”? If you learned from your mistakes, that’s wisdom. If you keep repeating the same mistakes, that’s foolishness. When considering the legalization of illegal drugs, there are too many fools among us who will continue to make bad choices and those with wisdom will be left with the financial baggage. It this wasn’t a definite truth, I wouldn’t have a problem with it but it is the truth and others will have to pay the price for foolish choices and sometimes that price will be your life. NO…DO NOT LEGALIZE ALL ILLEGAL DRUGS.


#146

Prove it. Cannabis has been legal in Colorado for 6 years and your fantasy world has materialized there yet