How Picky Are YOU?


#21

If sour cream actually gags you, that’s sad. It is a GREAT way to add fat to dishes that need it, kinda like putting butter on potatoes or deep frying them.

I’m not saying you “should” eat it, just that it’s a shame.


#22

I am not very picky at all. The older I get the more I enjoy variety

I have never cared for French onion soup.

I would never order crab legs at a restaurant or purchase any to cook at home. Too much work!

I love condiments, on my food, beside my food, in my food.


#23

Always been picky. Refused to try meat until I was about 12. Have subsisted my entire life off at least one PB&J a day.

But mostly these days my lack of branching out is because I have a (probably clinical) level of anxiety over my food allergy. I am so paranoid that I end up eating at the same “safe” places over and over until I get sick of it and rotate. Which is kind of funny because I’ve only ever had one reaction at a restaurant–the rest have been at other people’s homes. I now have serious trust issues.


#24

Casserole makes it truly Midwestern. :slight_smile: I have never had true New York or Jersey pizza, but I hope to compare one day for reals because I can’t see how anything is better than a deep dish.


#25

I’m a picky eater, and it sucks. Any and all types of seafood make me gag.

People treat me like a racist. “How dare you not like,!” “What’s wrong with you?”

Sorry it’s not a choice.


#26

I’m a semi picky eater, nowhere near as picky as I was as a child. I like a few dairy products, but not others. Can’t stand mayo to save my life. I’ve more of an aversion to sweet–love sweets, but only up to a certain point–than to hot and spicy. If anything, even peppers like habanero need a little more heat to 'em. Coffee anything but black is a rarity, and gets sugar only when it really is too strong.


#27

Remind me never to have lunch with you, you “icky eater”. :rofl:

I have never belittled anyone for putting forth that they did not wish to eat something. But I have seen the reaction you related, it was a method of operation in my own family as I grew up. It didn’t even have to be about something you could not stand to eat, if there was food left in the dishes on the table and you said “no thanks” to my grand parents OMG it was like committing a mortal sin right there on their dining room table.

Never did like the “here try this” people, especially in restaurants when I am out with others. It is about as welcome as the sharks that rush out with perfume spritzers that so many mall stores employ to assail the customers as they unwittingly wander in to the dangerous waters. :angry:


#28

“Icky eater” actually kind of worked in the context. A lot of parents and adults don’t realize how much stress they put on kids by forcing them to eat foods they don’t like. It can often lead to phobias about certain foods.


#29

Sometimes I look at food I’ve eaten all my life in a different way.

For instance, on thanksgiving it seems strange to have the carcus of a dead animal sitting in the middle of the table.

I feel like a caveman eating a chicken leg.

And that poor baby lamb that died for my gyro.

It’s all still delicious though.


#30

Good points. I was a parent that offered my kids all kinds of foods but never was a food Nazi. I did like for them to at least try a little. If they didn"t want it after a little bite I didn’t force the issue.


#31

I was sorta raised on a farm. It’s weird but when you grow up that close to your food source, including your meat, there is nothing gruesome at all about killing and eating it. It’s sort of wholesome and attached.

I’m not sure how I’d feel if I grew up where acres and acres of airplane hangers raise pork or chckens in endless rows of tiny cages, or where men line up, punch a clock and sign out the company tractor they’ll be using for the day.

But being raised on an actual farm farm, eating pork is like eating strawberries.


#32

I didn’t get involved with farm life until my divorced mother started dating a dairy farmer. I was about 12 or 13. They finally married when I was 16. It is a good thing to get to see first h and what goes into putting food on the table. I got some of that long before the farm what with helping my grand parents in our gardens, and with canning. Then grandpa taught me to hunt and fish, and to clean the wild game, and fish. Also my mother would take us kids out into the country to find and pick wild berries and nuts and persimmons and such. Great lessons.

We never butchered our own beef, but we did butcher a bunch of pigs. A cold nasty tiring job, but one with lots of mealtime rewards for months to come.


#33

I did not know you had farming in ya Lou. It’s good to know.


#34

Pretty picky. I won’t eat mustard, mayonnaise, onions, mushrooms, any kind of seafood except for shrimp, beef that is not ground, anything that is spicy or bitter, and some other stuff. Some of these I simply don’t like the texture. I guess I’m just hypersensitive.


#35

I can’t kill an animal. Too much of a city boy I guess. It’s enough that I have to look at a mural of a giant cow when I eat a cheeseburger at bob Evans. And yeah, I feel like a hypocrite.


#36


#37

btw.

how do you do that multiple quote thing?


#38

Click that thing on the left that looks like a cartoon caption. Thanks - I’ll have salad for lunch. :slight_smile:


#39

Chicken salad? Chef salad with ham and bacon bits?
Thanks.


#40

I lied. Turns out I’m having pepperoni pizza - I’m being treated to lunch. I don’t even know what animal (or animals) that comes from. I’ll tend it’s a vegetable.