Former President Jimmy Carter wins his second Grammy


#1

Jimmy Carter, 94, just won his second Grammy Award, reports the L.A. Times. This one is for the audio edition of his book “Faith: A Journey for All." He has been nominated a record (for ex-Presidents) nine times. Carter is tied with Barack Obama and Bill Clinton for Grammy wins. Obama won twice in the spoken word category: in 2008 for his audiobook for “The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream” and two years earlier for “Dreams From My Father.”

President Bill Clinton has won twice: in 2005 for “My Life,” and the year before for the spoken word album for children Grammy for narrating Jean-Pascal Beintus’ composition “Wolf Tracks.” Richard Nixon, the only Republican to be nominaed, received one nomination in 1978 for “The Nixon Interviews With David Frost.”

A posthumous spoken word nomination went to Harry S. Truman for “The Truman Tapes” album released in 1977. John F. Kennedy also scored a posthumoous nomination for the spoken-word album “The Kennedy Wit,” released in 1964.

He’s also the third oldest Grammy winner (George Burns was the second oldest at 95, Pinetop Perkins the oldest at 97).

(Mods: Please move this to Politics if it should be there. Thanks. )


#2

They give Grammys for audio books? Really?


#3

I wasn’t really aware of that, either, but if you think about it, it’s no different than “The Kennedy Wit,” the paperback by Bill Adler (I think I have a copy, actually).


#4

Sorry, it seems kind of lame to me.


#5

Oh, I don’t know.

Some narrators sound as if they’re dead & propped up, while others can make the material fascinating.

If he can be a good narrator, why not? In any case I wish him well.


#6

Grammys used to be about music. A guy reading a book isn’t music.


#7

Spoken Word Grammy is a category every year.


#8

Another sign that award shows for subjective material are goofy. How is any one musician (or reader, I guess) any better than another? And this is coming from someone who understands that objective measurements in music (and reading) exist.