Carbon tax. Who's in favor?

#1

It’s possible that we may see one proposed in the name of climate change or infrastructure.

I will go down as being opposed. Why? It’s regressive. The poor and working class get slammed. The upper middle class and rich don’t really care. A few thousand bucks here or there make no difference to them. It does not create any additional budget issues like it would for those with less means. And wealthy folks driving $80,000 Tesla’s may end up not paying at all. So no. Find a better way. Off set it with spending cuts in other areas or what ever. Carbon tax is a really bad idea.

#2

I am in favor of a carbon tax.

Do we still have acid rain like we did in the 70s and 80s?

#3

Okay. Thanks for your feedback. You do understand that the poor get hit the hardest and some wealthy may not get hit at all. Right?

#4

I am by no means rich, but I prefer to live in a world that is not dying around me. If the wealthy paid for this, you would probably be screaming “wealth redistribution!!!”

Or something like that. If I must pay, I will pay.

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#6

And somehow punishing the poor for using the only energy available to them will stop this from happening? Maybe if they cancel their vacations to mud lake because they can’t afford to drive there will save the Earth?

#8

Well, let’s do nothing and just keep destroying the planet. What’s your plan?

What does “off set spending cuts” mean?

#10

I would be against, but not for the reasons you cited.

The same amount of carbon would still be emitted into the air, but those emission dollars collected would be sent to third world countries that sell us their emission slice. Thus wealth is transferred from the United States to third world. But nothing is actually improved in the amount of carbon emissions being released.

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#11

To be fair, we don’t have to have a carbon tax. We can just have a carbon limit.

#12

We just started it in canada barely noticed it

#13

I’ll start with this. The climate change movement seriously lacks any creativity. For example. Your clothes dryer is coal driven and is a major consumer of energy. What if every person who believes in climate change decided to let God dry his clothes whenever possible? The energy savings nationwide would be enormous. And it does not punish the poor. Rather than start a movement to do this type of thing, liberals usually come up excuses not to do it. BTW, I live in an upper middle class neighborhood. And in about 15 minutes my laundry is going outside on the rack.

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#14

And somehow people believe that wealth redistribution is the way to save the world. That’s part of the scam. It’s actually more about socialism than it is climate. If they want to get serious about this, take the politics out of it and come up with real, creative ideas. Not punishment.

#15

So your idea to stop a global climate catastrophe is for people to air dry their laundry?

#17

Nope. You are suffering from tunnel vision. It’s to find creative ways to save energy. I gave you an excellent example. Do you have any creative ideas of your own? I’ll give you another one after I receive yours.

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#18

I am creative on my own when it comes to reducing what I consume, reusing what I have and recycling everything I can. I have gotten down to 1/2 bag of trash per week. I’ve started composting too.

But I haven’t cracked the code on society. How do you change society without changing the cost for people in society? I don’t think you can, but I also don’t think that the poor are as frail as you say. I think they are much more resilient for changes in cost.

An example, in Michigan we have a deposit of 10 cents per can on carbonated beverages. Without that deposit, how many people would just throw their cans in the street when done? A lot. I worked in Chicago for a short time, and the streets were littered with broken glass. I was shocked. You don’t see that in Michigan. (at least I don’t)

Now, it’s more expensive for the poor, and the rich can still throw out the bottles/cans. There are no cans in the street or highways. How would this have happened without the state requiring a bottle deposit? How do you get people to change with no incentive to change? Why would they change?

#19

It’s something when, as happened recently, the watermelon is so red on the inside that a prominent green cannot handle it.

#20

I would also highly recommend not coal drying your laundry. Those things seriously suck down some carbon.

Another creative idea would be that every single climate warrior (I’m not one) with the means to do it convert his own house to solar, geo-thermal or both. Do something other than complain rich folks. People with money who have done nothing, have no business telling people that do not have money to pay more.

Also, the biggest factor is rarely if ever mentioned. Population. The Earth’s population is rapidly increasing. It is nearly impossible to reduce carbon output while increasing the number of carbon consumers. The math doesn’t work.

#21

Yep. I’m a climate change skeptic. People who are not, act as if they are frozen in place without government. There is no action they can take as individuals or groups. So they sit and wait for government to save them. Zero self awareness, zero creativity.

#22

To be honest, I don’t have much hope for the future.

Over the course of my life, over half of all animals on this planet are gone. The amount of carbon being pumped into the oceans and acidifying them is bleaching the coral in the reefs. Much of the ocean’s animals live there.

But I’m just going to keep going. I buy used clothes, drive a old car (2000) and reduce consumption as much as I can. Maybe others will do the same.

#23

The world is not dying around you! :roll_eyes: The earth has been here for billions of years and survived a lot worse then a bunch “hot hair” co2 spewing liberals who if they ever shut their mouths with GW fear mongering would solve the problem they claim we have. :open_mouth:

#24

War! Huh, Good God Y’all,
What is it good for?
Cutting carbon footprint.