Are you willing to alter your lives after this is over?

I am not. Human history is loaded with various plagues. They have always been here, always will. My personal awareness will certainly be greater. But I will not be willing to change my life and surrender any liberties what so ever. If I want to risk going to a ballgame, a restaurant or ride a train, I will risk it. I am willing to accept zero additional restrictions when they finally let us out.

What permanent restrictions will you accept, if any?

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What “permanent restrictions” are you expecting?

There is no doubt that COVID-19 has/will change the worldview of a lot of people. But in terms of laws and government, I don’t expect much.

Unless Trump decides to make this the new “WALL” issue (by that I mean an utterly stupid, yet effective populist/nationalist campaign along the lines of “THIS IS CHINA’S FAULT” or something along those lines).

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I would love to see something come of this after everything is over.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/trump-insurers-coronavirus-business-coverage-gray-area

This system we have now, were you pay premiums for years just for the privilege to sue for a claim later, really sucks.

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We also need a seriously look at sick leave policies, especially in service positions.

I’m not expecting anything. That will be revealed when the return to business plan comes out. But I won’t accept anything less than the same freedoms we had before the virus. And I certainly hope you are right. But we should be prepared since we don’t know if the plan contains permanent changes.

This is how I see it.

We (in the most global sense) will figure out how to deal with this. It will take time, but it will happen. We will either find a treatment or vaccine, or learn to deal with it like all the other viruses we’ve learned to deal with before.

But even after this is done, it will live in the consciousness of an entire generation. Society will be changed.

I think benefits should be left to the employer and employee. If employees don’t like them, then they can fire their employer and hire a better one.

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A “return to business plan”?

I don’t know what that means.

Yes, the standard “free market” argument.

I think you’re going to see that particular argument drop in popularity - on both sides of the aisle.

It’s amazing to me you think that works given the current disaster we’re in.

I respect that position, but we’re spending a gazillion government dollars right now subsidizing businesses to please let people take sick days off.

If it’s that important, it should probably be put in legislative writing before the next pandemic.

It amazes me that you are amazed by me. Knock yourself out. :+1: But as amazing as I am, I would like to scroll up and comment on the topic please. :relaxed:

People should not work for companies that do not provide decent benefits. They should take their skills and go elsewhere. Maybe become a welder instead of a waiter? If enough people do this, the service industry will have to change in order to keep their staff.

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So if this pops up again in November(very real possibility) you will not allow your freedoms to be infringed. You will not let any kind of stay at home ordinance to dictate how you live your life?

Not everyone has skills. Everyone needs sick-days though. Something should be done to address that gap.

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No more tongue kissing when I meet new people.

Sorry ladies (and gentlemen)

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Then they won’t earn as much as people who do. If they did not prepare for life, who’s fault is that? Maybe they should get some skills so they can do better? There is no reason to make a teenagers job your career.

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:rofl:

You answer my question first please. :+1:

Except for the fact that large employers are required by law to offer benefits, under Harry Truman’s employer mandate.